Blank Expression

Music mostly (but sometimes comics, film, writing)

Twitter: @_jimbush
Website: www.jim-bush.com

July 27, 2014

Jorge Ben - “Xica da Silver”

From Africa Brasil (1976)

This album is fantastic and coming in the mid-70’s adds more funk to the Tropicalia mix. 

July 25, 2014

Os Brazoes - “Espiral”

From Os Brazoes (1969)

This is a classic under-the-rader album. It’s pretty consistently strong. I highly recommend it for anyone interested in Brazilian psych and Tropicalia. I especially like when the horns come into the song after a minute and it gets off kilter.

I’ve loved this album for years so it’s cool to see that this was recently re-released by Light in the Attic records

July 23, 2014

O Bando - “Alegria - Alegria”

From O Bando (1969)

This is a more traditional Tropicalia sound than others on this list, but it’s a pretty infectious song. This is one my favorite tracks from this album. While some others are not quite as memorable, there are many good tracks and overall it’s still an enjoyable listen.

July 18, 2014

Liverpool - “Paz e Amor”

From Por Favor Sucesso (1969)

Liverpool were in some ways a combination of Tropicalia and psych rock/garage elements. Their vocal and rhythms are distinctively Brazilian, though. This is one of my favorite tracks from their only album, Por Favor Sucesso. It is emblematic that it’s a pretty mellow listen overall, though there are certainly rollicking numbers on the album as well.

July 18, 2014

Brazilia

I’ve been wanting to get back to posting music vids/songs on the blog for a while.

With the World Cup in Brazil ending last weekend, I thought it was a great chance to jump back in — by featuring some great Tropicalia/psych albums from Brazil.

August 26, 2013

Foxygen - “In the Darkness” and “No Destruction” (Takeaway Show - live)

Songs originally appear on We Are the 20th Century Ambassadors of Peace & Magic (2012)

I went to see Foxygen play a free show in Manhattan last month and I was really impressed by their presence live. I had been enjoying their album We Are the 20th… but it’s relatively chill. However, in a live setting the band really amps up the energy. At times, they are so frenetic that the songs seem to wobble on the brink of disaster. It mostly works, though. They have a fun attitude that borders on goofy, too. I think the latter is captured pretty well in this video.

It’s true that Sam France apes Jagger at times, which is even more apparent live when he’s using some of the same spastic body movements, but he’s got the voice to carry it off. I also think the band is as influenced by other 60s band — Beatles, Velvet Underground, Kinks, Donovan — as much as they are by the Stones.

August 21, 2013

This is how you lose her (Deluxe Edition) | Junot Diaz

Junot Diaz + Jaime Hernandez = wow.

I’ll admitt I didn’t like This Is How Your Lose Her nearly as much as Oscar Wao, but now I may need to own a second copy anyway.

hodgman:

I am so happy for Junot Diaz and so incredibly jealous that he got Jaime Hernandez to illustrate the new edition of THIS IS HOW YOU LOSE HER. 

You can see preview illustration at Entertainment Weekly HERE, though it’s a hard website to look at because some of it is not art by Jaime Hernandez and a lot of it is ads popping up in your face. 

That is all. 

Reblogged from

John Hodgman

August 13, 2013

laughingsquid:

Thorested Development, Animated Mashup of ‘Arrested Development’ & The ‘Thor: The Dark World’ Trailer

Major points for using “Sound of Silence.”

Reblogged from

Laughing Squid

May 9, 2013

Fever Tree - “Ninety-Nine and a Half”

From Fever Tree (1968)

I always enjoying figuring out the origins of samples in contemporary hip-hop and indie song. In this case, it’s a 10-second snippet at the beginning of “Ninety-Nine and a Half,” a track from the 1968 self-titled album by the Texas psych pop band Fever Tree. The song itself is a cover of a Wilson Pickett song called "Ninety-Nine and a Half (Won’t Do)."

A number of modern listeners, though, will recognize the snippet as the basis for the 2004 song "America’s Most Blunted" from Madvillian. Madvillian was a rap collaboration between rapper MF Doom and DJ/producer Madlib. The outstanding album Madvilliany is full of samples from old tracks. The Fever Tree sample appears in the background of “America’s Most Blunted” at 0:40 and then becomes the main beat at 0:47. It’s pretty interesting that Madlib took a 10-second snippet from a lesser-known song (Fever Tree’s best known song is "San Francisco Girls") from relatively obscure 60s psych pop band and made it the main music to a song.

April 25, 2013

Goat: "Dreambuilding"

Here’s the new single from the Swedish group Goat. I was able to see the band perform Tuesday at the Music Hall of Williamsburg. I’ve written before about how much I liked World Music, but I was still really impressed by their performance. The band is so talented and tight. It was one of the best shows I’ve seen in a while.

They do wear costumes and masks on stage, which may seem a bit gimmicky, but it certainly does make for a theatrical look. I think I’d describe Goat’s costumes as Beatles-in-India meets Holy Mountain meet Mardi Gras. In other worlds, they looked great, though I can’t imagine how hot the members must be inside.

Oh, and yeah, “Dreambuilding” is another awesome song.